EARTHLESS

EARTHLESS: OUT OF THIS WORLD
OUT OF THIS WORLD

This series takes place in the Ring of Cenotes in Mexico where the ancient Mayans believed the underground rivers were a gateway to another world. Today, tourists gather to momentarily escape gravity, to swim, dive and explore. When all around us is full of immobile and solid substances, water is uniquely fluid and pliable; it allows our imagination to flow.   

Fifty years after the moon landings we continue to dream of space travel and building colonies on Mars. We have the ability to view Earth from another perspective and to realise how fragile it is. In water there is a parallel, weightless atmosphere where aquanauts consider the planet from another dimension. Here we can dream of a future, free of pollution and global warming, and inspire stewardship of Earth’s remarkable rivers, oceans and lakes.

CREATED BY A COLOSSAL ASTEROID

The Ring of Cenotes in Mexico was created sixty-six million years ago when a colossal asteroid hit Earth. The impact was so powerful that it left behind a crater 180 kilometers across, liquidised the Earth’s crust and brought about climate change that led to the extinction of the dinosaurs. Throughout this region rivers now flow, deep underground through limestone rock that has, in places, collapsed to leave these remarkable archaeological formations.

Centote (English: /sɪˈnoʊti/ or /sɛˈnoʊteɪ/; American Spanish: [seˈnote]) a natural pit, or sinkhole, resulting from the collapse of limestone bedrock that exposes groundwater underneath.

UNIQUE UNDERWATER ENVIRONMENTS

Each cenote has its own story and looks completely different from the next. At Angelita, for example, the alchemy of ancient decaying trees creates an underwater ‘cloud’.  In another secret cenote a huge mammoth tooth rests on the sand as if it had just fallen into the water yesterday. 

 Despite their differences all the cenotes are connected by a mysterious network of rivers that flow deep underground through seemingly watery moonscapes before swelling up into lost, prehistoric lakes.

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